PRIVACY & COOKIE POLICY

seescape privacy statement

seescape is the operating name of Fife Society for the Blind which is a charity registered in Scotland, number SC001354, and is a company limited by guarantee registered in Scotland number 164278.

We are a data controller which means that we determine the purposes for which, and the manner in which, any personal data are, or are to be, processed. We are registered as a data controller with the Information Commissioner’s Office, registration number: Z7547301.

We process personal information as the provider of specialist services in Fife to people with sight loss and process personal data for our service users and their families; employees, contractors, consultants, volunteers, trustees, suppliers, clients and individual contacts e.g. fundraising database.

We are committed to protecting the privacy and security of personal information and being transparent about what we do with it. This privacy statement describes how we collect, hold and use personal information.

We will only use your information for the purpose for which it was provided.

We will only share your personal information with the organisations and/or individuals you have consented to unless we have a legal obligation to disclose your information.

We will only share relevant and necessary information.

We will never share or sell your information to other organisations for marketing, market research or commercial purposes.

Ways in which we collect personal information:

Directly from you

Examples of this would be when:

• you request support or services from us

• you become a trustee

• you apply for a job or volunteering role with us

• you donate to us

• you order or buy aids or equipment from us

• when you supply goods or services to us.

If you write to us or email us we may keep a record of that correspondence and the response we make. If you telephone or text us we may record or copy the content in order to respond to you.

From another source

Examples of this would be when:

• you have given your consent to the NHS to share your Certification of Visual Impairment with us

• you have given your consent (to another agency, to a family member or to a friend/carer) to be referred to us for support

• from fundraising giving platforms

From our website

When you use the contact form on our website to get in touch with us. We will record the information required to process your request.

If you visit our website we may record the details of your visit including, but not limited to, traffic data, location data, web logs, communication data and the resources that you access and use. We may collect information about your computer, including where available your IP address, operating system and browser type.

Cookies

‘Cookie’ is a name for a small file, usually of letters and numbers, which is downloaded onto your device, like your computer, mobile phone or table when you visit a website. They let websites recognise your device, so that the sites can work more effectively, and also gather information about how you use the site. A cookie, by itself, cannot be used to identify you.

We may use ‘cookies’ to monitor how people use our site. This helps us to understand how people use our website so we can develop and improve the design, layout and function of the sites.

You can normally alter the settings of your browser to prevent it from accepting cookies.

By using our website you consent to our use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy.

How we will use your personal information

When we collect your personal information, we will provide you with information about how it will be used.

Legal basis for using your information

In some cases, we will only use your personal information where we have your consent to do so.

In other cases, depending on your relationship with us, we may need to use your personal data where it is relevant and appropriate for us to do so. This means we use legitimate Interest as the basis for using your personal information. Examples of this would be:

• to send clients essential information about our organisation

• to send clients information about our services and support, events and activities or our fundraising efforts, unless they have told us they do not want such information

• to process an order for aids or equipment

• to carry out research to help us develop and improve our services

• for our recruitment and selection process and for employment purposes

• for our trustee recruitment and selection process and governance matters

• to manage company membership

• to record donations, including related payment details

• for our volunteer recruitment and selection process and for volunteer management purposes

• for service agreement or contract management

• for supply management.

When considering if the use of your personal information is relevant and appropriate to how you are involved with us, we always assess your data protection rights and our business interests to ensure they are balanced. Please contact us should you have any queries about this.

Keeping in touch with you about our work

We will use your personal information to send you information about:

• our services and support, including events and activities

• our fundraising efforts.

However, we will not send you such information if you have asked us not to. Please contact us should you want us to stop sending you information about our work or if would like to receive it by a different method.

We will never share or sell your information to other organisations for marketing, market research or commercial purposes.

Who we share your information with

When we collect your personal information, we will provide you with information about who we may, or will, share it with.

Where we require your consent to share your information we will explain this to you and obtain your consent before sharing your information with another organisation or individual.

We will only share relevant and necessary information.

Where we need to share your information for contractual, regulatory or legal reasons we will provide you with information to explain this.

When we share information with suppliers, or others who provide services on our behalf, for example, payroll and pension services, transport providers or activity providers, we will only provide them with the personal information they need to know. We will check that they have appropriate data protection measures in place to protect your information.

How we keep your personal information secure

We have implemented appropriate physical, technical and organisational measures to protect the personal information we have under our control, both on electronic and paper-based systems. This protection covers improper access, use, alteration, destruction and loss.

Depending on why you provided us with your personal information and how we are using it, we may need to transfer your information outside the EU, (for example some of the systems we use to hold personal information may be provided by an organisation that stores the data on computer systems held outside the EU). Although the country may not be subject to the same data protection laws as companies based in the UK, we will endeavour to make sure they provide an adequate level of protection in accordance with UK data protection law or ensure that safeguards are put in place to protect your personal information.

Our website

Although we do our best to protect your personal information sent to us via our website contact form, we cannot guarantee the security of data transmitted to our website.

Our website contains links to other sites. We are not responsible for the content or the privacy practices employed by other sites. This privacy statement does not cover the information practices of those websites or advertisers.

We will not sell any information about your web browsing activity.

How long we keep your personal information for

We will keep your personal information securely for as long as we need to for the purposes we collected it and in accordance with our records retention schedule.

Your rights over your data

You have the following rights in respect of the personal information we hold about you:

• The right to be informed

• The right of access

• The right to rectification

• The right to erasure

• The right to restrict processing

• The right to data portability

• The right to object

• Rights in relation to automated decision making and profiling.

Please note, some of your rights only apply in certain circumstances and we may not be able to fulfil every request. Please contact us should you have any queries.

Amendments

We may update this policy from time to time by publishing an updated version on our website.

Contact us

If you have any queries about your rights and our responsibilities in respect to your personal information, please contact the Chief Executive, seescape, Wilson Avenue, Kirkcaldy KY2 5EF, telephone 01592 644979 or email to info@seescape.org.uk

You can also contact the Information Commissioner’s Office on 0303 123 1113 or visit their website for more information at www.ico.org.uk

Get In Touch

Facebook

4 days ago

Seescape - Fife

‼️6 ‘Accidentally’ accessible products for people with sight loss‼️
There are many products out there that can make things easier if you have a visual impairment. Many of these products have been designed specifically for visually impaired people, but there are some products that weren’t which are still just as useful... Read on as we review three high tech, and three low tech, products that could transform your life, all of which were not designed with visually impaired people in mind.
High Tech Products
1. Apple Pay
Apple is very committed to the accessibility of their products. With features including VoiceOver and Zoom, Apple has really gone the extra mile to make their products accessible for their visually impaired users.
Apple Pay, although not an accessibility feature, makes Apple products even more accessible as it makes it easier for visually impaired people to pay for goods in-store and online. Apple Pay works on iPhones, iPads, Apple Watches and Macs, once you have stored your card details in your Apple wallet, you do not have to re-enter them every time you use Apple Pay.
There is no upper limit when you use Apple Pay so you can use it unlimited times per day and you can make purchases of over £45, the limit for contactless payments when you use your card.
Apple Pay is also useful in situations when the card machine is inaccessible, for example, some retailers use touch-screen card machines making it difficult for a visually impaired person to locate the numbers when entering their PIN.

2. Bone Conduction Headphones
Unlike regular headphones, bone conduction headphones sit on your cheekbones so the sound is transmitted through your bones into your inner ear.
This means that the headphones never cover your ears so you can hear the sound coming out of the headphones at the same time as any sound around you.
Designed for sportspeople, bone conduction headphones also have impressive benefits for people living with sight loss.
If you are out and about, bone conduction headphones can allow you to listen to your phone while you listen out for traffic and all other sounds you need to listen out for when travelling out and about independently.
3. Tile
Tile is the perfect solution if you are prone to losing, or mislaying, essential items such as your keys.
Tile works through Bluetooth trackers which connect to your iOS or Android device through the Tile app which you download onto the device you want to link the tile trackers to.
Once you download the app and activate the Tile trackers, just use the app to ‘ring’ your tile trackers and the tile trackers will sound an audible tone. Alternatively, use your Tile trackers to ring your phone, even when it is muted.
You can also ring your Tile trackers using Siri (if you are using iOS 12 or later), Alexa or Google Assistant.

Low Tech Products
1. Snappy-Caps
Snappy-caps turn drinking cans into bottles. Just open your can, place the snappy-cap onto the bottle and push down firmly until it snaps onto the can.
Designed for when out and about, snappy-caps also can be beneficial for people with sight loss. The snappy-caps come with lids so you will always have a lid to put on your can to avoid accidental spillages. Snappy-caps also make it easier for pouring the contents of the can into a glass as you can place the lip of the snappy-cap onto the edge of the glass while you pour.
Snappy-caps are very cheap – you can buy a pack of six for just £3.99. They are also reusable so once you have finished drinking out of one can, remove the snappy-cap, give it a wash and you can then place it on your next can.
For more information and to place an order, visit the snappy-caps website.
They are also available on e-bay and Amazon – prices vary starting from £3.99 for 6.
2. Elastic Bands
Elastic bands are a simple, yet effective, solution for distinguishing between products.
If you struggle to work out which is shampoo and which is conditioner, or you have tins of different foods that feel identical, then placing elastic bands around products could be the solution for you.
Elastic bands are an effective alternative to identification solutions designed specifically for people with sight loss.
3. Afro Comb
The afro comb is a fantastic solution for chopping fruit and vegetables safely if you have a visual impairment. Just push the afro comb into what you want to chop, and use it as a guide for the knife as you cut between the afro comb’s prongs.
You do not need to have your fingers anywhere near the knife when chopping and it helps you to cut even slices. It can be used on a range of vegetables.
Get Buying!
This is just a selection of some of the products that happen to be accessible or make your life easier if you have sight loss. These products provide mainstream, and easily available, solutions to help you to be more independent.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

5 days ago

Seescape - Fife

Come and join us for the next instalment of The Assistive Technology Social Hub…

Thursday July 16th
10am-11.30am
Sight and Sound Technology and our friends at seescape are continuing to bring you biweekly sessions which provide support, insight and

analysis. Our aim as always is to promote independent living through innovation.

Our next session is entitled
‘An Interactive Introduction to the World of Low Vision Technology!’

The next Social Hub session will feature an interactive presentation that explores a wide range of low vision solutions. The interactive format will require you to discuss 3 low vision scenarios. There will be 5 assistive technology solutions available for each scenario and we would like you to find the most suitable and beneficial for the individual bearing in mind their difficulties and what they would like to achieve.

The session will concentrate on the following areas of interest;

• Education tools
• Balance and co-ordination
• Font style, size
• Contrast
• Scanning text
• Reduce eye strain and screen glare
• Reading text in a variety of formats
• Alternatives to magnification

Register in advance for this webinar:
zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_zq7SSdrxR-Sgv-6tGDmoog

“For most people, technology makes things easier. For those with a disability, it makes things possible!”

Now more than ever assistive technology is invaluable to those with sight loss or visual impairment. We have a solution that could be hugely beneficial to you or a family member so please do join us and hear others share their sight loss journey.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

5 days ago

Seescape - Fife

‼️12 top tips for shopping for a visually impaired person‼️

At a time when visually impaired people may need more assistance than usual with their shopping. Here are some useful tips.
An important point to note at the start is that everyone will have their own ideas about what would help them, so it would be useful to share these with the person who is shopping for you (or if you are the one doing the shopping, ask the individual if they have ideas that work for them).
The one biggest tip is to try and maintain routine; buy the same things, cook the same things, and eat the same things if you can. Now is not the time to start experimenting!
So, this is written as if you are shopping for someone. Have a look at these tips, they may help you.
Tip 1
Get the person to make a shopping list, or ring them and make it with them together.
Think long term – what will last? Maybe discuss adding a few long-life supplies that you know they like and will last.
Sometimes it is good to have quick to do meals
Tip 2
Try and find out what food they can prepare independently.
They may sometimes have help in normal circumstances, but we do not always realise what help we have.
Similarly, some people will only use a hob if someone else is there to check it is safe.
Tip 3
Try and stick to regular brands and products that they normally use.
They will be familiar with cooking and preparing these foods – familiarity and routine are key.
They know what the cooking times are for certain things as they do them on a regular basis.
Tip 4
Check health and dietary requirements in case you have to substitute items.
Got to check this one, it is so important. There is no point isolating if you end up with a problem because you have eaten the wrong stuff.
Tip 5
Check what they can manage to cook or prepare in case you have to make substitutions to the shopping list.
Do they use a microwave or oven? There are certain products where it makes very little difference if you change the brand – soup is soup and beans are beans, so people will know how to reheat (neither is it dangerous if you under heat).
However, if you got chicken thighs with bones instead of fillets, they may struggle with bones and fat, just cannot see it to work it out.
Tip 6
Ask how they sort their shopping, for example, should you categorise bags (main meals, desserts, snacks and so on)?
Have a system for putting it away – if you do not put it away, you do not know you have got it.
Use a magnifier and phone to identify products. Time-consuming, but rewarding. Some people will have to work through a bag, so you may want to keep an idea of what is in each bag and let them know by phone.
Tip 7
Work out how you are going to label some of it.
Work out with the individual how you are going to label items, and what you have available to use at your disposal, such as elastic bands, string, or sellotape. You could even stick a white sticker on with bold black writing if it helps.
You can use string to tie on things, and keep the toiletries separate and tied in a bag. You are trying to make things feel different so they can be more easily distinguished
Tip 8
If they have a labelling device take it with you and label the food.
Clean it thoroughly before putting it in the bag to return with the shopping. You may have to learn how to use the gear, we all use it with no sight.
Tip 9
Keep a note of cooking instructions.
You can give instructions over the phone if you have a basic labelling system to identify the product. Take a picture with your phone.
You will be surprised at how much food is to be cooked at Gas Mark 6 for 20 minutes
At least if you’ve got a copy on your phone you will be able to go back and check, so take your picture as you put it in your trolley.
Tip 10
Leave the bags where the person can find them.
You can ring them and help guide them via the phone if possible. Wait at a distance while they get the shopping in.
Put the bags to one side, as no point risking the individual tripping over them. It is also helpful to put them in some form of order (remember tip 6 about how people would like the shopping packed).
Tip 11
You could describe the shopping through a closed window via phone or they may even use FaceTime (or similar).
You may be able to help them with a delivery that has had substitutions. Some of the food parcels will have random things in, possibly larger amounts. You may end up stood on the pavement shouting, but do not worry everyone will understand!
Tip 12
Remember you should observe all the government guidelines on distance, hand washing and sanitising of equipment and surfaces.
This goes without saying, but try and keep it as safe as you can. It certainly filled me with confidence when the Tesco delivery man had his gloves on, stood back and did it all by the book.
Final point to note....
Government advice is that volunteers or those helping with shopping should not enter the person’s home.
This is to reduce the risk of infection. If there is no other option, and the individual requests that you enter their home to unpack the shopping, and you are happy to do so, ask them to open the door themselves and move into another room while you are in the home.
Please wipe down any surfaces you touch with antibacterial wipes before leaving.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Seescape - Fife

‼️Top tips for social distancing if you are blind or visually impaired‼️

We keep hearing about 'social distancing' and how it’s going to become part of who we are and how we live for some time to come. Simple some people say - just be mindful and keep your distance. It’s enforced in shops already, and as more places open up it will be a big part of the plan.

Getting out and about with social distancing
Why do I want to get out and about? I’ve been at home now for many months and I like to keep my independence – so the skills that I’ve learned and my self-confidence both need building back up.
If you can’t get out, how about practicing your skills at home – get your long cane out and have a go around your home. Don’t forget that you made need upper and lower body protection if you go in your garden, as things might have grown!
So here are my 11 top tips for social distancing if you are blind or visually impaired.
Tip 1
Don’t be put off letting people know that you have a visual impairment.
Sometimes we keep it quiet and don’t want others to know. Well now it’s time for a change, let it out of the bag! It can take a long time to be comfortable letting others know, from admitting it to family all the way to long caning it in your local area. The difference it makes when people know is amazing!
Tip 2
If you’ve got a cane, use it! Keep it in view at all times (people tend to fold them away as soon as they can).
We know not everyone knows what a white cane is, but most do. It makes you noticeable, that’s why a symbol cane is called “symbol”, to let others know. Even if it’s still in the drawer (you know the one, in the kitchen with all the other stuff in, elastic bands, sellotape, etc.) – get it out!
Tip 3
Take your cane even if you are with someone; hold it to the side and make it obvious you are together and being guided.
You could fold your long cane in half so you don’t get tangled, or kick it up into your face.
Tip 4
If you’re using your long cane, make it obvious you are using it!
Keep your starting sweep obvious, make sure your arc is wide enough. Sometimes we keep it tight as we learn to use a cane more efficiently.
Using a bit of three-point touch keeps it noisy – this is where you add an extra tap to check your shoreline, it will help people hear you coming.
You could increase your arc width as long as you don’t compromise your safety, for example in a shop.
Tip 5
Keep to the inner shoreline, away from the kerb, and let others step out into the road.
Make your path definite and confident – and at least there should be fewer A-boards blocking the pavements at the moment!
Tip 6
If you think someone is too close, tell them you have a visual impairment and ask them whether they are at the correct distance.
It will also help you to test the distance when you hear them answer. If they are not, it may prompt them to move away.
Tip 7
Use a symbol you could contact seescape (01592) 644979 to issue you with one and to provide training. People who have had NVT training (on the lightbox) following a stroke/brain injury and worry about social distancing in these challenging times, may also benefit from using a symbol cane. Please contact us.
Tip 8
There are lots of other ways to make yourself visible, such as a high visibility vest or sash. Some shops and venues use the Sunflower Lanyard to help identify hidden disabilities, you can read more about it on the RNIB’s website.

It depends on what you feel comfortable with. You may find that people realise you have low vision when your phone starts speaking to you! Or take your magnifier out with you, it may help visually explain to others.
Tip 9
If you are using public transport, phone and book assistance if possible.
Ring the bus company and ask: “What can I expect on the bus, such as a new layout, etc?” Phone to find out the new system and what to expect if you go to any appointments in the future.
Tip 10
One thing to do is assume your hands need washing the minute that you leave the door.
Try to get out of the habit of touching your face (that’s easier said than done!) If you can get the correct hand wipes or sanitiser, put it in your pocket.
Tip 11
Disinfect your cane handle, and the end of it too if it’s been on the ground (it could have all the usual things on it you find on a pavement!)
Disinfect what you feel needs it, and when you’ve done wash your hands too.
Further support
We hope you have found these top tips for social distancing useful. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like further support – (01592) 644979
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

6 days ago

Seescape - Fife

‼️Top tips for social distancing if you are blind or visually impaired‼️
We keep hearing about 'social distancing' and how it’s going to become part of who we are and how we live for some time to come. Simple some people say - just be mindful and keep your distance. It’s enforced in shops already, and as more places open up it will be a big part of the plan.

Getting out and about with social distancing
Why do I want to get out and about? I’ve been at home now for many months and I like to keep my independence – so the skills that I’ve learned and my self-confidence both need building back up.
If you can’t get out, how about practicing your skills at home – get your long cane out and have a go around your home. Don’t forget that you made need upper and lower body protection if you go in your garden, as things might have grown!
So here are my 11 top tips for social distancing if you are blind or visually impaired.
Tip 1
Don’t be put off letting people know that you have a visual impairment.
Sometimes we keep it quiet and don’t want others to know. Well now it’s time for a change, let it out of the bag! It can take a long time to be comfortable letting others know, from admitting it to family all the way to long caning it in your local area. The difference it makes when people know is amazing!

Tip 2
If you’ve got a cane, use it! Keep it in view at all times (people tend to fold them away as soon as they can).
We know not everyone knows what a white cane is, but most do. It makes you noticeable, that’s why a symbol cane is called “symbol”, to let others know. Even if it’s still in the drawer (you know the one, in the kitchen with all the other stuff in, elastic bands, sellotape, etc.) – get it out!
Tip 3
Take your cane even if you are with someone; hold it to the side and make it obvious you are together and being guided.
You could fold your long cane in half so you don’t get tangled, or kick it up into your face.
Tip 4
If you’re using your long cane, make it obvious you are using it!
Keep your starting sweep obvious, make sure your arc is wide enough. Sometimes we keep it tight as we learn to use a cane more efficiently.
Using a bit of three-point touch keeps it noisy – this is where you add an extra tap to check your shoreline, it will help people hear you coming.
You could increase your arc width as long as you don’t compromise your safety, for example in a shop.
Tip 5
Keep to the inner shoreline, away from the kerb, and let others step out into the road.
Make your path definite and confident – and at least there should be fewer A-boards blocking the pavements at the moment!
Tip 6
If you think someone is too close, tell them you have a visual impairment and ask them whether they are at the correct distance.
It will also help you to test the distance when you hear them answer. If they are not, it may prompt them to move away.
Tip 7
Use a symbol you can contact seescape (01592) 644979 to issue you with one and to provide training. People who have had NVT training (on the lightbox) following a stroke/brain injury and worry about social distancing in these challenging times, may also benefit from using a symbol cane. Please contact us.
Tip 8
There are lots of other ways to make yourself visible, such as a high visibility vest or sash. Some shops and venues use the Sunflower Lanyard to help identify hidden disabilities, you can read more about it on the RNIB’s website.
It depends on what you feel comfortable with. You may find that people realise you have low vision when your phone starts speaking to you! Or take your magnifier out with you, it may help visually explain to others.
Tip 9
If you are using public transport, phone and book assistance if possible.
Ring the bus company and ask: “What can I expect on the bus, such as a new layout, etc?” Phone to find out the new system and what to expect if you go to any appointments in the future.
Tip 10
One thing to do is assume your hands need washing the minute that you leave the door.
Try to get out of the habit of touching your face (that’s easier said than done!) If you can get the correct hand wipes or sanitiser, put it in your pocket.
Tip 11
Disinfect your cane handle, and the end of it too if it’s been on the ground (it could have all the usual things on it you find on a pavement!)
Disinfect what you feel needs it, and when you’ve done wash your hands too.
Further support
We hope you have found these top tips for social distancing useful. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like further support – (01592) 644979
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook